Date of Award

Spring 2022

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

First Advisor

Dr. Jennifer L. Carter

Second Advisor

Dr. Thomas Gollery

Third Advisor

Dr. Joshua Henson

Abstract

The demand for healthcare services in the United States is expected to dramatically increase in the coming decades. To meet the growing demand, a healthy workforce of nurses is necessary. In response to the identified problem of novice nurse retention, the researcher examined the concepts of authentic leadership, leadership caring behaviors, and burnout to determine the impact of these factors on intent to stay within an organization for novice nurses with less than 1 year of experience at a large community hospital. The study findings demonstrate a statistically significant correlation between the factors of authentic leadership, leader caring behaviors, burnout, and the intent to stay within an organization. Burnout was most predictive of the intent to stay within the organization. The ancillary analysis also demonstrated the predictive nature of authentic leadership and leader caring in burnout experienced by novice nurses. These findings add to the body of knowledge surrounding the factors influencing novice nurse retention. To mitigate the looming nursing shortage, healthcare leaders must understand and address factors influencing nurse retention during their first years of practice.


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